ISSN: 1300-7777 E-ISSN: 1308-5263
Effects of sub-acute exposure to magnetic field on blood hematological and biochemical parameters in female rats [Turk J Hematol]
Turk J Hematol. 2006; 23(4): 182-187

Effects of sub-acute exposure to magnetic field on blood hematological and biochemical parameters in female rats

Chater Sihem1, Abdelmelek Hafedh1, Sakly Mohsen1, Pequinot Jean Marc2, Ben Rhouma Khmais1
1Faculté Des Sciences De Bizerte, Laboratoire De Biosurveillance Environnementale, Bizerte, Tunisia
2Faculté De Médecine Lyon Nord, Laboratoire De Physiologie Des Régulations Energétiques, Cellulaires Et Moléculaires, Lyon, France

The present work was undertaken in order to investigate the effects of magnetic field (MF) on hematopoiesis and fuel metabolites in female rats. At thermoneutrality (25°C), the exposition of rats 1 hour/day for 10 consecutive days to a MF of 128 mT (m Tesla) induced an increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin compared to controls. Exposure to MF also induced an increase in blood glucose levels but had no effect on triglyceride concentrations. Moreover, serum alanine aminotransferase activity remained unchanged in treated rats, while aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities increased by about 22% and 33%, respectively, following MF exposure. It was concluded that sub-acute exposure to MF induced elevations in hematocrit, hemoglobin, plasma fuel metabolites and tissue enzymes release within the blood. Key words: Magnetic field, hematology, glucose, triglycerides, plasma enzymes, rat.

Keywords: Magnetic field, glucose, triglycerides, plasma enzymes


Chater Sihem, Abdelmelek Hafedh, Sakly Mohsen, Pequinot Jean Marc, Ben Rhouma Khmais. Effects of sub-acute exposure to magnetic field on blood hematological and biochemical parameters in female rats. Turk J Hematol. 2006; 23(4): 182-187

Corresponding Author: Chater Sihem


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